260 genes

DNA Diet & Nutrition Test

Test type
Lab Test

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Collection method
Saliva

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£ 159,00

DNA Diet & Nutrition from GetTested is a health test that analyses your genetic variations to provide a detailed understanding of how your body processes various nutrients. Utilizing a simple saliva sample for DNA collection, this test delivers insights into your genetic makeup related to diet and nutrition. It offers a personalized analysis of macronutrients, fat metabolism, vitamin and mineral requirements, as well as genetic predispositions to various sensitivities/intolerances and eating behaviors.

The sample is easily collected via a saliva test and sent to our lab for analysis. The price includes return shipping to the lab. Within 6-8 weeks, you’ll receive your detailed results digitally.

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GetTested’s DNA Diet & Nutrition test

Optimize your diet based on your unique nutritional needs. GetTested’s DNA Diet & Nutrition offers a comprehensive DNA test providing scientific insights into your personal nutritional needs and the most suitable diet for you. By conducting a detailed analysis of your genes, you can gain invaluable information to customize your diet, lifestyle, and health plan to meet your individual needs.

Dietary Protein

GLP1R
GLP1R (Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor): GLP1R encodes the receptor for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone that regulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Activation of GLP1R by GLP-1 or GLP-1 analogs enhances insulin release, suppresses glucagon secretion, and promotes satiety, making it a key target for medications used to treat type 2 diabetes and obesity.
FTO
FTO (Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Protein): The FTO gene has garnered significant attention due to its strong association with obesity and body mass index (BMI) in various populations. It's thought to influence metabolic processes like energy homeostasis and fat storage. Research suggests that variations in the FTO gene can affect appetite and energy expenditure, making it a critical gene in understanding and potentially treating obesity.
CNDP1
CNDP1 (Carnosine Dipeptidase 1): CNDP1 encodes an enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of carnosine, a dipeptide that may have antioxidant properties. This enzyme's activity is particularly significant in the context of diabetes, where it's believed to play a role in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy. Understanding CNDP1's function is crucial for developing strategies to combat diabetic complications.
CNDP2
CNDP2 (Carnosine Dipeptidase 2): CNDP2, closely related to CNDP1, is another enzyme that participates in the metabolism of carnosine and anserine. Its function and significance are less understood than CNDP1, but it is believed to play a role in muscle and brain health. Research into CNDP2 may uncover new aspects of metabolic health and disease.
CLOCK
CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput): The CLOCK gene is fundamental in the regulation of circadian rhythms, which are the physical, mental, and behavioral changes following a 24-hour cycle. It is involved in the control of sleep-wake cycles and various physiological processes including metabolism. Mutations in the CLOCK gene can disrupt normal circadian rhythms, leading to various health issues such as sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, and mood disturbances.
NTN5
NTN5 (Netrin 5): NTN5 is part of the netrin family, which are crucial for neural development, especially in guiding axon growth. This gene's role is less studied compared to other netrins, but it is believed to have significant implications in the development of the nervous system and possibly in neurodegenerative diseases.
MTNR1B
MTNR1B (Melatonin Receptor 1B): MTNR1B encodes one of the receptors for melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep and circadian rhythms. This gene plays a crucial role in maintaining the body's internal clock and is also implicated in glucose homeostasis. Variations in MTNR1B have been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and disrupted sleep patterns.
ADRB3
ADRB3 (Adrenoceptor Beta 3): ADRB3 is a gene that encodes a beta-adrenergic receptor, primarily found in adipose tissue. It's involved in the regulation of lipolysis and thermogenesis, playing a significant role in energy expenditure and obesity. Variants of this gene have been studied for their potential impact on obesity and metabolic disorders.
FUCA1
FUCA1 (Alpha-L-Fucosidase 1): FUCA1 codes for an enzyme responsible for the breakdown of fucose, a component of complex sugars. Deficiencies in this enzyme can lead to fucosidosis, a rare lysosomal storage disorder. The study of FUCA1 is important for understanding various metabolic pathways and potential metabolic disorders.
ST6GAL1
ST6GAL1 (ST6 Beta-Galactoside Alpha-2,6-Sialyltransferase 1): This gene is involved in the process of adding sialic acid to proteins (glycoproteins). Its function is critical in cellular recognition and signaling processes. Changes in the activity of ST6GAL1 have been linked to various diseases, including cancer and autoimmune disorders.
TFAP2B
TFAP2B (Transcription Factor AP-2 Beta): TFAP2B plays a crucial role in embryonic development and differentiation. It is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of gene expression. Mutations in this gene can lead to developmental disorders and have been associated with obesity and diabetes.
NADSYN1
NADSYN1 (NAD Synthetase 1): NADSYN1 is involved in the synthesis of NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), a vital coenzyme in redox reactions. This gene's function is essential in various metabolic processes, and its role is increasingly recognized in the context of aging, cell death, and certain chronic diseases.

Dietary Fat

FTO
FTO (Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Protein): The FTO gene has garnered significant attention due to its strong association with obesity and body mass index (BMI) in various populations. It's thought to influence metabolic processes like energy homeostasis and fat storage. Research suggests that variations in the FTO gene can affect appetite and energy expenditure, making it a critical gene in understanding and potentially treating obesity.
STAT3
STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3): STAT3 is a critical transcription factor involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in the immune response and is heavily implicated in cancer biology, with dysregulation of STAT3 being linked to a variety of cancers and other diseases.
CETP
CETP (Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein): CETP plays a critical role in lipid metabolism, particularly in the transfer of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides between lipoproteins. Its function impacts the composition of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein), making it significant in the study of cardiovascular diseases. CETP inhibitors have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis due to their ability to raise HDL cholesterol levels.
NLRC5
NLRC5 (NOD-Like Receptor C5): NLRC5 is a member of the NOD-like receptor family and plays a crucial role in the immune system. It is involved in the regulation of MHC class I genes, which are essential for the immune system's ability to recognize and respond to pathogens. Abnormalities in NLRC5 function can lead to immune system dysregulation and have been associated with various autoimmune disorders.
AHSG
AHSG (Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein): AHSG, also known as fetuin-A, is a glycoprotein that plays a role in several physiological processes including mineralization inhibition and insulin sensitivity. High levels of AHSG are associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, making it a potential biomarker for these conditions.
CD36
CD36 (Cluster of Differentiation 36): CD36 is a multifunctional protein that plays a significant role in fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and atherogenesis. It acts as a receptor for various ligands including oxidized LDL, fatty acids, and phospholipids. CD36's involvement in lipid metabolism and its role in the development of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome make it a focus of medical research.
NSMAF
NSMAF (Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activation-Associated Factor): NSMAF is involved in the regulation of sphingomyelinase, an enzyme critical in sphingolipid metabolism. This gene plays a role in cell signaling pathways, particularly in response to external stress and in the induction of apoptosis. Its study is important for understanding various cellular processes and pathological conditions like inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.
CLOCK
CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput): The CLOCK gene is fundamental in the regulation of circadian rhythms, which are the physical, mental, and behavioral changes following a 24-hour cycle. It is involved in the control of sleep-wake cycles and various physiological processes including metabolism. Mutations in the CLOCK gene can disrupt normal circadian rhythms, leading to various health issues such as sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, and mood disturbances.
PPARA
PPARA (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha): PPARA is a key regulator of lipid metabolism, particularly in the liver. It is involved in the catabolism of fatty acids, and its activation can lead to increased fatty acid oxidation and decreased serum triglycerides. PPARA is also implicated in the regulation of inflammatory responses and is a target for drugs treating hyperlipidemias.
AGT
AGT (Angiotensinogen): AGT is a precursor to angiotensin, a peptide hormone that plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and fluid balance. Mutations in the AGT gene can influence the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding AGT's function is key in managing these conditions.
APOA1
APOA1 (Apolipoprotein A-I): APOA1 is the major protein component of HDL in plasma and plays a central role in cholesterol transport and metabolism. It facilitates the removal of cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Variations in APOA1 are associated with changes in HDL levels and risks of cardiovascular disease.
TCF7L2
TCF7L2 (Transcription Factor 7-Like 2): TCF7L2 is a key regulator in the Wnt signaling pathway, which is important for cell growth and development. Variants in this gene have been strongly associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes, possibly through effects on insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Its study is crucial for understanding the genetic basis of diabetes and developing potential treatments.
FCER1G
FCER1G (Fc Epsilon Receptor I Gamma): FCER1G is an important component of the high affinity receptor for the Fc region of immunoglobulin E (IgE). It plays a critical role in allergic responses and is involved in the activation of mast cells and basophils. Alterations in this gene can influence the severity and susceptibility to allergic diseases and asthma.
PPARG
PPARG (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma): PPARG is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid storage, glucose metabolism, and adipocyte differentiation. It is a key regulator of insulin sensitivity and is targeted by thiazolidinediones, a class of antidiabetic drugs. Its role in metabolic pathways makes it a significant gene in the study of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Saturated Fat

TLR4
TLR4 (Toll-Like Receptor 4): TLR4 is a part of the toll-like receptor family, crucial for the innate immune system. It recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharides and plays a key role in activating the immune response to pathogens. Dysregulation of TLR4 has been linked to a variety of diseases, including sepsis, atherosclerosis, and certain autoimmune disorders.
LPL
LPL (Lipoprotein Lipase): LPL is key in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. It hydrolyzes triglycerides in lipoproteins, like chylomicrons and VLDL, facilitating the release of free fatty acids for energy production or storage. Mutations in LPL can result in hyperlipidemia and increase the risk of pancreatitis and cardiovascular diseases.
FTO
FTO (Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Protein): The FTO gene has garnered significant attention due to its strong association with obesity and body mass index (BMI) in various populations. It's thought to influence metabolic processes like energy homeostasis and fat storage. Research suggests that variations in the FTO gene can affect appetite and energy expenditure, making it a critical gene in understanding and potentially treating obesity.
CETP
CETP (Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein): CETP plays a critical role in lipid metabolism, particularly in the transfer of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides between lipoproteins. Its function impacts the composition of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein), making it significant in the study of cardiovascular diseases. CETP inhibitors have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis due to their ability to raise HDL cholesterol levels.
PPARA
PPARA (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha): PPARA is a key regulator of lipid metabolism, particularly in the liver. It is involved in the catabolism of fatty acids, and its activation can lead to increased fatty acid oxidation and decreased serum triglycerides. PPARA is also implicated in the regulation of inflammatory responses and is a target for drugs treating hyperlipidemias.
AGT
AGT (Angiotensinogen): AGT is a precursor to angiotensin, a peptide hormone that plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and fluid balance. Mutations in the AGT gene can influence the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding AGT's function is key in managing these conditions.
APOA1
APOA1 (Apolipoprotein A-I): APOA1 is the major protein component of HDL in plasma and plays a central role in cholesterol transport and metabolism. It facilitates the removal of cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Variations in APOA1 are associated with changes in HDL levels and risks of cardiovascular disease.
STAT3
STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3): STAT3 is a critical transcription factor involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in the immune response and is heavily implicated in cancer biology, with dysregulation of STAT3 being linked to a variety of cancers and other diseases.
AHSG
AHSG (Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein): AHSG, also known as fetuin-A, is a glycoprotein that plays a role in several physiological processes including mineralization inhibition and insulin sensitivity. High levels of AHSG are associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, making it a potential biomarker for these conditions.
CD36
CD36 (Cluster of Differentiation 36): CD36 is a multifunctional protein that plays a significant role in fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and atherogenesis. It acts as a receptor for various ligands including oxidized LDL, fatty acids, and phospholipids. CD36's involvement in lipid metabolism and its role in the development of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome make it a focus of medical research.
CLOCK
CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput): The CLOCK gene is fundamental in the regulation of circadian rhythms, which are the physical, mental, and behavioral changes following a 24-hour cycle. It is involved in the control of sleep-wake cycles and various physiological processes including metabolism. Mutations in the CLOCK gene can disrupt normal circadian rhythms, leading to various health issues such as sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, and mood disturbances.
SIDT2
SIDT2 (SID1 Transmembrane Family Member 2): SIDT2 is involved in the cellular uptake of RNA molecules, playing a role in RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms. It's important in the study of gene regulation and has potential implications in the development of RNA-based therapeutics. The function of SIDT2 in RNA transport is crucial for understanding how cells regulate gene expression and respond to external RNA molecules.
FCER1G
FCER1G (Fc Epsilon Receptor I Gamma): FCER1G is an important component of the high affinity receptor for the Fc region of immunoglobulin E (IgE). It plays a critical role in allergic responses and is involved in the activation of mast cells and basophils. Alterations in this gene can influence the severity and susceptibility to allergic diseases and asthma.

Omega-3

WDR70
WDR70 (WD Repeat Domain 70): WDR70 is a gene that encodes a protein with a WD repeat domain, known for facilitating protein-protein interactions. This gene is implicated in various cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and possibly RNA processing. The specific functions of WDR70 are not fully understood, but it's believed to play a role in cellular organization and function.
CITED2
CITED2 (Cbp/p300-Interacting Transactivator With Glu/Asp-Rich Carboxy-Terminal Domain 2): CITED2 is a transcriptional modulator that interacts with various transcription factors and regulates gene expression. It's involved in embryonic development, including heart and neural development, and is implicated in response to hypoxia. Dysregulation of CITED2 can contribute to congenital abnormalities and other developmental disorders.
TNFSF10
TNFSF10 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 10): Also known as TRAIL, TNFSF10 is involved in inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. It plays a role in immune surveillance and cancer therapy, as it can selectively induce cell death in cancer cells while sparing normal cells. This gene is a focus in cancer research for its potential therapeutic applications.
COL11A1
COL11A1 (Collagen Type XI Alpha 1 Chain): COL11A1 encodes a component of type XI collagen, important in the structure and integrity of connective tissue. Mutations in this gene are associated with a variety of disorders affecting connective tissue, including certain types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Stickler syndrome.
AHI1
AHI1 (Abelson Helper Integration Site 1): AHI1 is involved in ciliogenesis and cellular signaling. Mutations in AHI1 are linked to Joubert syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays, cerebellar abnormalities, and other neurological symptoms. It plays a role in brain development and function.
G2E3
G2E3 (G2/M-Phase Specific E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase): G2E3 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a role in cell cycle regulation, particularly in the G2/M phase transition. It is involved in the ubiquitination and degradation of cell cycle regulators, and its dysregulation can lead to cell cycle abnormalities and contribute to tumorigenesis.
rs6553050
rs6553050: This genetic marker, known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), is located in the human genome and is used in genetic studies to identify variations that may be associated with specific traits or diseases. The presence or absence of such SNPs can be linked to genetic predispositions to certain health conditions or responses to medications. rs6553050 is one of the many SNPs that researchers investigate to understand the complex interactions between genetics and health.
MAP7
MAP7 (Microtubule-Associated Protein 7): MAP7 is involved in microtubule stabilization and interacts with motor proteins, influencing cell movement and organization. It plays a role in various cellular processes including mitosis and intracellular transport. Its function is crucial for maintaining cellular structure and dynamics.
TMEM258
TMEM258 (Transmembrane Protein 258): TMEM258 is a part of the oligosacch aryltransferase complex, involved in N-linked glycosylation, a process essential for protein folding and stability. It's implicated in the proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum and has potential roles in various physiological processes and diseases related to protein misfolding.
PIK3C2A
PIK3C2A (Phosphatidylinositol-4-Phosphate 3-Kinase Catalytic Subunit Type 2 Alpha): PIK3C2A is part of the PI3K family, playing a role in cell signaling pathways that control cell growth and survival. It's involved in the regulation of membrane trafficking, insulin signaling, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Dysregulation of PIK3C2A can contribute to various diseases, including cancer and metabolic disorders.
FADS2
FADS2 (Fatty Acid Desaturase 2): FADS2 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are essential components of cell membranes and precursors of signaling molecules. Variations in FADS2 can affect the metabolism of essential fatty acids and are linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases.
MYOM1
MYOM1 (Myomesin 1): MYOM1 is a structural protein found in the M-band of sarcomeres in muscle cells. It plays a crucial role in muscle contraction and elasticity. Mutations in MYOM1 can affect muscle function and have been studied in the context of muscle diseases and cardiomyopathies.
WSB1
WSB1 (WD Repeat And SOCS Box Containing 1): WSB1 is part of the SOCS (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling) box family, which are involved in protein degradation pathways. It plays a role in the regulation of various signaling pathways and has been implicated in responses to hypoxia and in the regulation of thyroid hormone activation.
PRR11
PRR11 (Proline Rich 11): PRR11 is a recently identified gene with not well-understood functions. It's thought to be involved in cell cycle regulation and has been implicated in cancer biology, particularly in cell proliferation and tumor growth.
SYCP2L
SYCP2L (Synaptonemal Complex Protein 2-Like): SYCP2L is involved in meiosis, playing a role in the formation of the synaptonemal complex, which is essential for the pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes. It's important in understanding the mechanisms of genetic recombination and fertility, with potential implications in reproductive biology and disorders.
rs2129588
rs2129588: Similarly, rs2129588 is another SNP. These genetic variations are the most common type of genetic difference among people. Each SNP represents a difference in a single DNA building block, called a nucleotide. For example, an SNP may replace the nucleotide cytosine (C) with the nucleotide thymine (T) in a certain stretch of DNA. rs2129588, like other SNPs, can serve as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. They are key in the field of genomics for studies on gene-disease associations, pharmacogenomics, and population genetics.
ADRA1A
ADRA1A (Adrenoceptor Alpha 1A): ADRA1A is a subtype of the alpha-1-adrenergic receptors, involved in the physiological responses to adrenaline and noradrenaline, particularly in smooth muscle contraction. It plays a role in cardiovascular function, including blood pressure regulation and vascular tone. Abnormalities in ADRA1A can have implications in cardiovascular diseases and disorders of the autonomic nervous system.

Unsaturated Fat

PPARG
PPARG (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma): PPARG is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid storage, glucose metabolism, and adipocyte differentiation. It is a key regulator of insulin sensitivity and is targeted by thiazolidinediones, a class of antidiabetic drugs. Its role in metabolic pathways makes it a significant gene in the study of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
FADS2
FADS2 (Fatty Acid Desaturase 2): FADS2 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are essential components of cell membranes and precursors of signaling molecules. Variations in FADS2 can affect the metabolism of essential fatty acids and are linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases.
RFC4
RFC4 (Replication Factor C Subunit 4): RFC4 is a part of the replication factor C complex, essential for DNA replication and cell cycle control. It plays a role in the loading of DNA polymerases onto DNA during replication and repair. Dysregulation of RFC4 can contribute to genomic instability and is studied in the context of cancer.
UCP3
UCP3 (Uncoupling Protein 3): UCP3 is a member of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins, playing a role in thermogenesis and energy balance. It is implicated in the regulation of body weight and metabolism, and its activity can influence obesity and metabolic disorders.
PON1
PON1 (Paraoxonase 1): PON1 is an enzyme associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and is involved in the hydrolysis of organophosphates and lipid peroxides. It plays a role in preventing LDL oxidation, and variations in PON1 are linked to cardiovascular disease risk.
PPARA
PPARA (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha): PPARA is a key regulator of lipid metabolism, particularly in the liver. It is involved in the catabolism of fatty acids, and its activation can lead to increased fatty acid oxidation and decreased serum triglycerides. PPARA is also implicated in the regulation of inflammatory responses and is a target for drugs treating hyperlipidemias.
FABP2
FABP2 (Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2): FABP2 is involved in the intracellular transport of long-chain fatty acids and their acyl-CoA derivatives. It plays a crucial role in fatty acid absorption and metabolism in the intestine. Variations in FABP2 can affect lipid metabolism and are associated with metabolic disorders, including diabetes and obesity.
ABTB1
ABTB1 (Ankyrin Repeat and BTB Domain Containing 1): ABTB1 is a protein that contains both ankyrin repeats and a BTB (POZ) domain, suggesting a role in protein-protein interactions. It is implicated in various cellular processes, including the regulation of transcription and possibly in the development of certain cancers. The full range of functions of ABTB1 is still under investigation.
ANKK1
ANKK1 (Ankyrin Repeat and Kinase Domain Containing 1): ANKK1 is involved in signal transduction and potentially in the regulation of dopamine receptors, which are important for brain function. Variants near the ANKK1 gene have been linked to neuropsychiatric disorders and addiction, possibly due to their influence on dopamine signaling.
KCNMB3
KCNMB3 (Potassium Calcium-Activated Channel Subfamily M Regulatory Beta Subunit 3): KCNMB3 is part of a family of calcium-activated potassium channels, which are important in regulating neuronal excitability and vascular tone. This gene plays a role in blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular function, and variations can have implications in hypertension and heart diseases.
APOA1
APOA1 (Apolipoprotein A-I): APOA1 is the major protein component of HDL in plasma and plays a central role in cholesterol transport and metabolism. It facilitates the removal of cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Variations in APOA1 are associated with changes in HDL levels and risks of cardiovascular disease.
ST6GAL1
ST6GAL1 (ST6 Beta-Galactoside Alpha-2,6-Sialyltransferase 1): This gene is involved in the process of adding sialic acid to proteins (glycoproteins). Its function is critical in cellular recognition and signaling processes. Changes in the activity of ST6GAL1 have been linked to various diseases, including cancer and autoimmune disorders.
NOS3
NOS3 (Nitric Oxide Synthase 3): NOS3 is responsible for the production of nitric oxide (NO) in blood vessels, playing a key role in vascular endothelial function. It regulates vasodilation, blood pressure, and has anti-atherosclerotic properties. Variations in NOS3 are associated with cardiovascular disease risks, including hypertension and coronary artery disease.
ADAM17
ADAM17 (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 17): ADAM17, also known as TACE (TNF-alpha converting enzyme), is involved in the shedding of membrane-bound proteins, including growth factors, cytokines, and receptors. It plays a key role in cell signaling, inflammation, and cancer. Dysregulation of ADAM17 activity is implicated in various diseases, including arthritis, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders.

Food Allergies

HLA-DPA1
HLA-DPA1 (Major Histocompatibility Complex, Class II, DP Alpha 1): The HLA-DPA1 gene is a part of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, which plays a critical role in the immune system. Specifically, this gene is involved in the presentation of peptides derived from extracellular proteins to T cells. Its importance lies in immune response regulation and its association with various autoimmune diseases. The diversity of alleles in the HLA-DPA1 gene is key to the adaptive immune response, making it a significant focus in transplant medicine, autoimmune disease research, and vaccine response studies.
LRRC32
LRRC32 (Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 32): LRRC32, also known as GARP, is involved in the regulation of immune responses, particularly in T-regulatory cells. It plays a role in maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmune reactions.
TLR1
TLR1 (Toll-Like Receptor 1): TLR1 is part of the toll-like receptor family, crucial in the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns and helps initiate immune responses. Variations in TLR1 can influence susceptibility to infectious diseases.
FHIT
FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad Diadenosine Triphosphatase): FHIT is a tumor suppressor gene involved in purine metabolism. Loss or alteration of this gene has been linked to a variety of cancers, indicating its role in tumor suppression.
GSTP1
GSTP1 (Glutathione S-Transferase Pi 1): GSTP1 plays a role in detoxification processes by conjugating reduced glutathione to a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous compounds. Polymorphisms in GSTP1 are associated with susceptibility to cancer and other diseases where detoxification is a factor.
FLG
FLG (Filaggrin): FLG encodes a protein crucial for skin barrier function. Mutations in FLG are strongly associated with skin conditions like atopic dermatitis (eczema) and can increase the risk of other allergic diseases.
TMEM243
TMEM243 (Transmembrane Protein 243): The function of TMEM243 is not well characterized. It is a transmembrane protein, and like many such proteins, it may be involved in cellular signaling or transport processes.
SPINK6
SPINK6 (Serine Peptidase Inhibitor, Kazal Type 6): SPINK6 is involved in skin barrier function and has been implicated in skin diseases. It acts as an inhibitor of serine proteases, which are important for various physiological processes including inflammation and immune response.
LINGO4
LINGO4 (Leucine Rich Repeat And Ig Domain Containing 4): LINGO4 is a member of the LINGO family and is involved in neural development and regeneration. Its role is not fully understood, but it may be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and neural repair mechanisms.
KIZ
KIZ (Kizuna Centrosomal Protein): KIZ encodes a protein involved in centrosome integrity and spindle formation during cell division. It is important for maintaining genomic stability, and disruptions in KIZ function can contribute to developmental disorders and cancer.
SERPINB10
SERPINB10 (Serpin Family B Member 10): SERPINB10 is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors and plays a role in regulating protease activity in various biological processes. Its specific functions and implications in human disease are not fully understood.
HLA-DRA
HLA-DRA (Major Histocompatibility Complex, Class II, DR Alpha): HLA-DRA is a key gene in the MHC class II complex, crucial for the immune response. It presents peptides derived from extracellular proteins to T cells, and variations in this gene can affect immune system function and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.
BMPR1B
BMPR1B (Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type 1B): BMPR1B is a receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins, involved in bone formation and development. It plays a role in cell growth and differentiation and has been studied in relation to skeletal disorders and cancers.
DIPK2A
DIPK2A (Divergent Protein Kinase Domain 2A): DIPK2A is a lesser-known gene with limited information available. It may be involved in kinase activity, impacting cellular signaling pathways.

Salt Sensitivity

NR2F2
NR2F2 (Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 2 Group F Member 2): NR2F2, also known as COUP-TFII, is a transcription factor involved in the development and function of several organs, including the heart and vascular system. It regulates genes involved in angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) and metabolic processes. Abnormal NR2F2 function has implications in developmental disorders and various cancers, where it can influence tumor growth and metastasis.
WNK1
WNK1 (WNK Lysine Deficient Protein Kinase 1): WNK1 is a serine/threonine kinase involved in regulating electrolyte balance and blood pressure. It affects sodium and potassium transport in the kidneys, influencing fluid balance and blood pressure. Mutations in WNK1 can lead to hereditary hypertension and electrolyte imbalances, making it a key gene in understanding certain forms of high blood pressure.
RAD52
RAD52 (RAD52 Homolog, DNA Repair Protein): RAD52 plays a pivotal role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, crucial for maintaining genomic stability. It is particularly involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway, which is important for the accurate repair of DNA during cell division. Defects in RAD52 can lead to genomic instability, increasing the risk for various cancers and contributing to the progression of certain inherited disorders.
SGK1
SGK1 (Serum/Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1): SGK1 is a serine/threonine kinase regulated by glucocorticoids and involved in cell survival, ion transport, and metabolic processes. It plays a role in responding to stress and in the regulation of ion channels, particularly in the kidneys, affecting sodium and water balance. Dysregulation of SGK1 has implications in hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and could contribute to the development of certain cancers.
ADRB2
ADRB2 (Adrenoceptor Beta 2): ADRB2 encodes the beta-2-adrenergic receptor, which is involved in the 'fight or flight' response. It mediates smooth muscle relaxation in the airways and blood vessels and is a target for drugs treating asthma and COPD. Genetic variations in ADRB2 can affect an individual's response to these medications.
CLGN
CLGN (Calmegin): CLGN is involved in sperm-egg fusion during fertilization. It functions in the endoplasmic reticulum of the testis and is essential for male fertility. Mutations in CLGN can lead to infertility due to its role in sperm development and function.
GC
GC (Group-Specific Component, also known as Vitamin D Binding Protein): GC is a protein that binds and transports vitamin D and its metabolites in the blood. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. Variations in GC can affect vitamin D levels and metabolism, influencing bone health and potentially impacting the risk of autoimmune diseases.

Vitamin D

GC
GC (Group-Specific Component, also known as Vitamin D Binding Protein): GC is a protein that binds and transports vitamin D and its metabolites in the blood. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. Variations in GC can affect vitamin D levels and metabolism, influencing bone health and potentially impacting the risk of autoimmune diseases.
ADH1B
ADH1B (Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1B): ADH1B is involved in the initial step of alcohol metabolism, converting ethanol to acetaldehyde. Genetic variations in ADH1B can affect the rate of alcohol metabolism, influencing alcohol tolerance and susceptibility to alcohol-related diseases.
COPB1
COPB1 (Coatomer Protein Complex Subunit Beta 1): COPB1 is part of the coatomer protein complex involved in intracellular transport. It plays a role in transporting proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, crucial for proper cell function and protein sorting.
PDE3B
PDE3B (Phosphodiesterase 3B): PDE3B is important in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism. It plays a role in breaking down cyclic AMP, a messenger molecule, which affects processes like lipolysis and insulin secretion. It has implications in metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes.
RRAS2
RRAS2 (RAS Related 2): RRAS2 belongs to the RAS family of genes, involved in cell growth and differentiation. It plays a role in signal transduction pathways and is implicated in various cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration.
PSMA1
PSMA1 (Proteasome Subunit Alpha 1): PSMA1 is a component of the proteasome, a complex responsible for degrading unwanted or damaged proteinsin cells. It plays a crucial role in protein quality control and cell regulation. Dysregulation of proteasome activity, including alterations in PSMA1, can contribute to diseases like cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Vitamin B12

FUT5
FUT5 (Fucosyltransferase 5): FUT5 is another enzyme involved in fucose metabolism, adding fucose to glycans, which are essential for cell-cell interaction and communication. Alterations in FUT5 activity can influence immune responses and have been studied in relation to cancer.
FAM240C
FAM240C (Family With Sequence Similarity 240 Member C): FAM240C is a less characterized gene, with its function still being elucidated. Like other family members, it may play a role in cellular processes such as cell division or signal transduction.
RGS7
RGS7 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 7): RGS7 is involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, modulating their signaling pathways. It plays a role in neuronal function and has been implicated in neurological disorders.
2SLC25A2
SLC25A2 (Solute Carrier Family 25 Member 2): SLC25A2 encodes a member of the solute carrier family of mitochondrial transport proteins, specifically involved in the transport of ornithine across the mitochondrial membrane. This process is crucial in the urea cycle and amino acid metabolism. Dysfunctions in this gene can lead to metabolic disorders, highlighting its importance in understanding metabolic pathways and potential therapeutic targets for related diseases.
9FOXK1
FOXK1 (Forkhead Box K1): FOXK1 is a member of the forkhead box (FOX) family of transcription factors, characterized by a distinct DNA-binding forkhead box. FOXK1 plays a pivotal role in regulating gene expression involved in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and longevity. Its significance is particularly noted in muscle development and regeneration, as well as in the regulation of metabolic processes. The activity of FOXK1 has been linked to various pathological conditions, including cancer, making it a gene of interest in both developmental biology and disease research.
LAMA4
LAMA4 (Laminin Subunit Alpha 4): LAMA4 is part of the laminin family, crucial for cell adhesionand the integrity of the extracellular matrix. It plays a significant role in tissue organization, angiogenesis, and has implications in various pathological conditions, including cancer and vascular diseases.
CHODL
CHODL (Chondrolectin): CHODL encodes a protein that may be involved in cell adhesion and chondrocyte differentiation. Its exact function is not fully understood, but it may have roles in cartilage formation and musculoskeletal development.
ARAP2
ARAP2 (ArfGAP With RhoGAP Domain, Ankyrin Repeat, and PH Domain 2): ARAP2 is involved in cell signaling pathways, acting as a GTPase-activating protein for Arf and Rho family members. It's important for cell migration and cytoskeletal organization, with potential implications in cancer metastasis and cellular morphology.
C1QL3
C1QL3 (Complement C1q Like Protein 3): C1QL3 is a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein family, potentially involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Its exact physiological role is still being explored, but it may have implications in immune system modulation and neuroinflammation.
RGS18
RGS18 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 18): RGS18 is involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling, specifically influencing signaling in hematopoietic cells. It plays a role in platelet function and immune responses, with its dysregulation potentially impacting blood coagulation and immune system disorders.
ADGRL3
ADGRL3 (Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor L3): ADGRL3 is a gene encoding a protein that belongs to the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family, which is known for mediating cell-cell interactions and playing a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system. It is particularly important in brain development and neuronal signaling. Recent research has linked variations in ADGRL3 to neurological disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suggesting its significant influence on neural connectivity and brain function.
C16ORF82
C16ORF82 (Chromosome 16 Open Reading Frame 82): Also known as FAM173B, C16ORF82 is a lesser-known gene and is currently under research to fully understand its function. Preliminary studies suggest that it may be involved in mitochondrial processes, potentially impacting energy metabolism at the cellular level. Given its mitochondrial association, it could have implications in disorders related to mitochondrial dysfunction, although more research is needed to clarify its specific role.
POU3F3
POU3F3 (POU Class 3 Homeobox 3): POU3F3 is a member of the POU family of transcription factors, known for their role in regulating gene expression in the development of the nervous system. It is crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of neural progenitor cells, influencing the development of various brain regions. Research has shown that mutations or dysregulation of POU3F3 can be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders and might contribute to the etiology of certain psychiatric conditions.
KCNK2
KCNK2 (Potassium Two Pore Domain Channel Subfamily K Member 2): KCNK2 encodes a protein that forms part of a potassium channel, which plays a significant role in setting the electrical activity of neurons. These channels are involved in regulating neuronal excitability and are important for various physiological processes, including the regulation of sleep and anesthesia. Dysfunctions or mutations in KCNK2 have been implicated in neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and paroxysmal movement disorders.
PCSK2
PCSK2 (Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 2): PCSK2 is involved in the processing of precursor proteins into their biologically active forms. It is particularly important in the maturation of neuropeptides and hormones in neuroendocrine tissues. Dysregulation of PCSK2 can affect the synthesis of important signaling molecules, impacting processes like stress response, metabolism, and growth.

Folate (Vitamin B9)

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

Vitamin K

SIDT2
SIDT2 (SID1 Transmembrane Family Member 2): SIDT2 is involved in the cellular uptake of RNA molecules, playing a role in RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms. It's important in the study of gene regulation and has potential implications in the development of RNA-based therapeutics. The function of SIDT2 in RNA transport is crucial for understanding how cells regulate gene expression and respond to external RNA molecules.
CTNNA2
CTNNA2 (Catenin Alpha 2): CTNNA2 is involved in cell adhesion and signaling pathways. It plays a role in the nervous system, particularly in synaptic plasticity and neuronal connectivity. Mutations or alterations in CTNNA2 have been linked to neurological disorders, highlighting its importance in brain function and development.
CYP4F2
CYP4F2 (Cytochrome P450 Family 4 Subfamily F Member 2): CYP4F2 is part of the cytochrome P450 family, involved in metabolizing fatty acids, drugs, and toxins. It plays a role in vitamin K and eicosanoid metabolism, affecting blood clotting and inflammation processes. Genetic variations in CYP4F2 can influence responses to certain medications, especially anticoagulants.
CYP4F11
CYP4F11 (Cytochrome P450 Family 4 Subfamily F Member 11): CYP4F11 is another member of the cytochrome P450 family, involved in the oxidation of fatty acids and drugs. Its role in lipid metabolism and drug detoxification is important for understanding individual differences in drug responses and susceptibility to certain diseases related to lipid metabolism.
ATG12
ATG12 (Autophagy Related 12): ATG12 is a key gene involved in the process of autophagy, a cellular mechanism for degrading and recycling cellular components. This gene plays a crucial role in cellular maintenance and survival, particularly under stress conditions. It's involved in the formation of a conjugate with ATG5, which is essential for the autophagosome formation, a pivotal step in the autophagy pathway. Dysregulation of ATG12 has been linked to various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.
CDO1
CDO1 (Cysteine Dioxygenase Type 1): CDO1 is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, a critical step in the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. This process is essential for the regulation of cellular cysteine levels and for the production of taurine and sulfate. Abnormalities in CDO1 function can affect cellular redox status and have been linked to various health issues, including cancer, as cysteine metabolism is crucial for cell proliferation and apoptosis.
KCNK9
KCNK9 (Potassium Two Pore Domain Channel Subfamily K Member 9): KCNK9 encodes a member of the potassium channel family, specifically a two-pore-domain potassium channel. These channels are involved in setting the resting membrane potential and regulating neuronal excitability. Mutations in KCNK9 have been associated with Birk-Barel mental retardation dysmorphism syndrome, highlighting its role in neural development and function.

Zinc

SORBS3
SORBS3 (Sorbin And SH3 Domain Containing 3): SORBS3, also known as vinexin, is involved in cytoskeletal organization and cell signaling. It plays a role in linking the cytoskeleton to the cell membrane and is involved in signal transduction pathways related to cell movement and adhesion. Alterations in SORBS3 function can affect cellular architecture and have implications in cancer progression and metastasis.
SLC5A6
SLC5A6 (Solute Carrier Family 5 Member 6): SLC5A6, also known as the sodium dependent vitamin transporter, is crucial for the absorption of biotin, a B-vitamin, and possibly other water-soluble vitamins. This gene is important for maintaining vitamin levels in the body, with a deficiency potentially leading to a range of health issues, including skin disorders, hair loss, and neurological symptoms.
CA2
CA2 (Carbonic Anhydrase II): CA2 encodes an enzyme that is extremely important in the regulation of pH and fluid balance in various tissues, including the kidney. It catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide, playing a vital role in respiratory gas exchange and acid-base balance. Mutations in CA2 can lead to conditions like osteopetrosis and renal tubular acidosis, highlighting its essential role in bone and kidney function.
SLC39A8
SLC39A8 (Solute Carrier Family 39 Member 8): SLC39A8 is a transporter protein involved in the cellular uptake of divalent cations, particularly zinc and manganese. It plays a crucial role in metal ion homeostasis and is important for various biological processes, including immune function and neural development. Mutations in SLC39A8 have been associated with multiple health issues, including congenital disorders of glycosylation.
SCAMP5
SCAMP5 (Secretory Carrier Membrane Protein 5): SCAMP5 is part of the SCAMP family, involved in membrane trafficking processes. It plays a role in the regulation of membrane recycling and exocytosis, particularly in neurons. SCAMP5's function is important for neurotransmitter release and neuronal communication, and it may have implications in neurological disorders.
NBDY
NBDY (NABP Domain Containing): NBDY, also known as C11orf73, is a relatively uncharacterized gene. It contains a domain found in nucleic acid-binding proteins, suggesting a potential role in DNA or RNA metabolism. The specific functions and implications of NBDY in human health and disease are yet to be fully elucidated.

Magnesium

MTMR7
MTMR7 (Myotubularin Related Protein 7): MTMR7 is part of the myotubularin family, enzymes involved in the regulation of cellular lipid levels, specifically phosphoinositides. This gene plays a role in intracellular signaling and trafficking. Mutations or dysregulation of MTMR7 can impact cellular processes like autophagy and endocytosis, and have been studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases.
VIPR1
VIPR1 (Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Receptor 1): VIPR1 encodes a receptor for vasoactive intestinal peptide, a neuropeptide involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, immune regulation, and water and ion flux in the lungs. It plays a significant role in circadian rhythms and is implicated in various disorders, including asthma and pulmonary hypertension.
CSTA
CSTA (Cystatin A): CSTA encodes a cysteine protease inhibitor, playing a critical role in protecting the skin and mucous membranes from protease-mediated damage. It is important in skin integrity and immune defense. Mutations in CSTA can lead to skin disorders and increased susceptibility to certain infections.
FGFR2
FGFR2 (Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2): FGFR2 is a receptor for fibroblast growth factors and is involved in numerous processes including cell growth, differentiation, and repair. Mutations in FGFR2 are associated with various developmental disorders, including craniosynostosis and skeletal dysplasia, and are implicated in certain types of cancer.
RALGDS
RALGDS (Ral Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Stimulator): RALGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor important in signal transduction pathways. It activates Ral GTPases, playing a role in cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in RALGDS function have been linked to cancer development and progression.
CDKL2
CDKL2 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 2): CDKL2 is involved in neuronal development and function. It belongs to the cyclin-dependent kinase family and is thought to play a role in signal transduction and cell cycle regulation. Its specific role in neurons suggests a potential involvement in neurodevelopmental processes and neurological disorders.
PAPSS2
PAPSS2 (3'-Phosphoadenosine 5'-Phosphosulfate Synthase 2): PAPSS2 is essential for the biosynthesis of PAPS (3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate), a key sulfate donor in various sulfation reactions. It's important in the metabolism of hormones, drugs, and other molecules. Mutations in PAPSS2 can lead to disorders like spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, underscoring its role in skeletal development.
RTL1
RTL1 (Retrotransposon Like 1): RTL1 is a gene thought to be derived from a retrotransposon and is involved in placental development. It has imprinted expression, meaning it is expressed from only one parental allele. Dysregulation of RTL1 can have implications in diseases related to genomic imprinting, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.
ALPK1
ALPK1 (Alpha Kinase 1): ALPK1 is a kinase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including inflammation and immune responses. It has been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in such conditions.
METTL21C
METTL21C (Methyltransferase Like 21C): METTL21C is part of the methyltransferase family, enzymes that transfer methyl groups to various substrates. Its specific functions are not fully understood, but it may play a role in post-translational modification of proteins, impacting various cellular processes.
CANT1
CANT1 (Calcium Activated Nucleotidase 1): CANT1 is involved in the hydrolysis of UDP, a nucleotide involved in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Mutations in CANT1 are associated with skeletal disorders like Desbuquois dysplasia, highlighting its importance in bone development and cartilage formation.
DLK1
DLK1 (Delta Like Non-Canonical Notch Ligand 1): DLK1 is a transmembrane protein involved in the regulation of adipogenesis, neurogenesis, and other developmental processes. It acts as a regulator of Notch signaling pathways and has been implicated in metabolic regulation and cancer.
THBS3
THBS3 (Thrombospondin 3): THBS3 encodes a member of the thrombospondin family, involved in cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix communication. It plays a role in tissue remodeling and wound healing, and is also important in angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation. Dysregulation of THBS3 has been linked to various pathological conditions, including fibrosis and cancer.
TRPM6
TRPM6 (Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily M Member 6): TRPM6 is a channel involved in magnesium absorption and homeostasis. It is essential for maintaining proper magnesium balance in the body, and mutations in TRPM6 can lead to hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, a condition characterized by low levels of magnesium and calcium in the blood.
HDHD2
HDHD2 (Haloacid Dehalogenase-Like Hydrolase Domain Containing 2): HDHD2 is an enzyme that belongs to the haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase family. Its specific biological functions are not well characterized, but it may be involved in metabolic processes and signaling pathways within the cell.
SHROOM3
SHROOM3 (Shroom Family Member 3): SHROOM3 is a protein involved in the regulation of cell structure and shape, particularly in actin filament organization. It plays a crucial role in neural tube closure during embryonic development and has been implicated in various developmental disorders. SHROOM3 is also studied for its role in kidney and heart diseases.

Iron

CARMIL1
CARMIL1 (Capping Protein Regulator and Myosin 1 Linker 1): CARMIL1 is involved in regulating actin dynamics, an essential component of the cellular cytoskeleton. It plays a crucial role in cell movement, structure, and signaling. Mutations or disruptions in CARMIL1 can affect cell motility and have been linked to immune system dysfunctions and certain forms of cancer.
CDH19
CDH19 (Cadherin 19): CDH19 belongs to the cadherin family, which are key molecules in cell-cell adhesion, crucial for tissue integrity. CDH19 is particularly important in the nervous system, where it's involved in neuron-neuron interactions and plays a role in neural development. It has been studied in relation to neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders.
CLDN11
CLDN11 (Claudin 11): CLDN11 encodes a component of tight junctions, structures that are critical for maintaining the barrier function in tissues. It is particularly important in the central nervous system and the testes, where it plays a role in myelin sheath formation and spermatogenesis. Mutations in CLDN11 can result in neurological and reproductive issues.
ERG
ERG (ETS Transcription Factor ERG): ERG is a member of the ETS transcription factor family and plays a key role in blood vessel development, hematopoiesis, and bone development. Aberrations in ERG have been implicated in the development of certain cancers, particularly prostate cancer and Ewing sarcoma.
HFE
HFE (Homeostatic Iron Regulator): The HFE gene is involved in the regulation of iron absorption and homeostasis. Mutations in HFE can lead to hereditary hemochromatosis, a condition characterized by excessive iron accumulation in the body, leading to organ damage.
IGLV4-60
IGLV4-60 (Immunoglobulin Lambda Variable 4-60): IGLV4-60 is part of the immunoglobulin gene family and is involved in the adaptive immune response. It encodes a component of the variable region of lambda light chains in antibodies, playing a role in antigen recognition. The diversity of immunoglobulin genes like IGLV4-60 is crucial for the ability of the immune system to respond to a wide array of pathogens.
IRX2
IRX2 (Iroquois Homeobox 2): IRX2 is a transcription factor part of the Iroquois homeobox gene family, playing a significant role in embryonic development. It's involved in the patterning and morphogenesis of various tissues, including the heart and neural tissues. Dysregulation of IRX2 has been implicated in developmental disorders and potentially in cancer.
MAPRE1
MAPRE1 (Microtubule-Associated Protein, RP/EB Family, Member 1): MAPRE1, also known as EB1, is involved in the stabilization and regulation of microtubules, crucial components of the cell's cytoskeleton. It plays a key role in cell division and chromosome segregation and is important in neuronal development and cancer biology.
NOTCH4
NOTCH4 (Notch Receptor 4): NOTCH4 is part of the Notch receptor family, which are key players in cell-to-cell communication, regulating cell fate decisions during development. NOTCH4 is particularly involved in vascular development and immune function. Abnormal NOTCH4 signaling can lead to developmental disorders and has been linked to diseases and certain types of cancer.
PLAAT1
PLAAT1 (Phospholipase A And Acyltransferase 1): PLAAT1 is an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, particularly in the remodeling of phospholipids in cell membranes. Its specific physiological roles are not fully understood, but it may be involved in cell signaling and membrane dynamics, with potential implications in metabolic and inflammatory processes.
PLCG2
PLCG2 (Phospholipase C Gamma 2): PLCG2 plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways, particularly in immune cells. It's involved in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, a key step in the activation of the protein kinase C pathway. Mutations in PLCG2 are associated with immune-related disorders and have been studied in the context of autoinflammatory diseases.
SCGN
SCGN (Secretagogin): SCGN is a calcium-binding protein predominantly expressed in neuroendocrine cells. It's involved in the regulation of hormone secretion and cellular signaling. SCGN has potential roles in neuroprotective mechanisms and has been studied in relation to neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease.
TMC5
TMC5 (Transmembrane Channel Like 5): TMC5 is a member of the TMC family, which are proposed to function as ion channels or transporters. The specific role of TMC5 is not well characterized, but it may be involved in sensory processes or cellular homeostasis. Its function and implications in health and disease are still being explored.
TMPRSS6
TMPRSS6 (Transmembrane Serine Protease 6): TMPRSS6 is important in iron regulation, specifically in the control of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron absorption. Mutations in TMPRSS6 can lead to iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA), a condition characterized by anemia that does not respond to oral iron therapy.
ZFAT
ZFAT (Zinc Finger And AT-Hook Domain Containing): ZFAT is a transcription factor believed to play a role in immune function and cell survival. It has been implicated in autoimmune diseases and is studied for its role in lymphocyte development and function.
SLC24A2
SLC24A2 (Solute Carrier Family 24 Member 2): SLC24A2 encodes a potassium-dependent sodium/calcium exchanger, which is important for calcium homeostasis in cells. It's particularly expressed in the retina and the brain, suggesting roles in neural function and vision. Mutations or dysfunction in SLC24A2 can have implications for neurological and visual disorders.

Potassium

BEND5
BEND5 (BEN Domain Containing 5): BEND5 is a gene that is relatively less understood but is thought to be involved in chromatin organization and gene regulation. The BEN domain suggests a role in DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Research is ongoing to elucidate its specific functions and its implications in cellular processes and diseases.
CASQ2
CASQ2 (Calsequestrin 2): CASQ2 is involved in calcium storage within the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle cells. It plays a critical role in regulating calcium homeostasis and cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in CASQ2 are linked to catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, a condition that causes irregular heartbeats in response to physical activity or stress.
DMBX1
DMBX1 (Diencephalon/Mesencephalon Homeobox 1): DMBX1 is a homeobox gene implicated in early brain development, particularly in the diencephalon and mesencephalon regions. Its role is crucial in the formation and differentiation of various brain structures. Alterations in DMBX1 expression or function may have implications in developmental brain disorders.
ETV3
ETV3 (ETS Variant Transcription Factor 3): ETV3 is part of the ETS family of transcription factors, known for their roles in regulating gene expression involved in cell growth, development, and differentiation. ETV3 acts primarily as a transcriptional repressor and is involved in various biological processes, including immune response regulation.
FMO2
FMO2 (Flavin Containing Monooxygenase 2): FMO2 is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, drugs, and other foreign compounds, using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor. It plays a role in detoxifying nitrogen-containing compounds and is expressed mainly in the lungs. Genetic variants of FMO2 can affect its enzymatic activity and influence individual responses to certain drugs and environmental toxins.
FYB2
FYB2 (FYN Binding Protein 2): FYB2, also known as ADAP2, is involved in signal transduction pathways within immune cells. It acts as an adaptor protein, mediating interactions between various signaling molecules, and plays a role in the regulation of immune cell activation and response. Its function is important for understanding the mechanisms of immune regulation and potential immune-related disorders.
GALNT2
GALNT2 (Polypeptide N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2): GALNT2 is involved in the process of glycosylation, where it adds N-acetylgalactosamine to proteins. This modification is crucial for protein function and cellular communication. Variations in GALNT2 have been linked to lipid metabolism and are associated with lipid levels in the blood, impacting the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
HMCN1
HMCN1 (Hemicentin 1): HMCN1 is a large extracellular matrix protein involved in cell adhesion and tissue integrity. It plays a significant role in the eye, particularly in the structure of the retina and vitreous body. Mutations in HMCN1 are associated with age-related macular degeneration and other ocular disorders.
LURAP1
LURAP1 (Leucine Rich Adaptor Protein 1): LURAP1 is a leucine-rich protein that's believed to play a role in signal transduction pathways. While its specific functions are not fully understood, it is thought to be involved in the regulation of cellular processes such as cell migration and cytoskeletal organization.
NVL
NVL (Nuclear VCP-Like): NVL is a member of the AAA-ATPase family and is involved in various cellular processes, including ribosome biogenesis and the response to cellular stress. It has a role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and proper function of the nucleolus.
OLFM3
OLFM3 (Olfactomedin 3): OLFM3 is part of the olfactomedin domain-containing protein family and is predominantly expressed in the brain. It may play a role in neural development and function, although its specific functions in the nervous system are still being explored.
PTPRC
PTPRC (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Receptor Type C): PTPRC, also known as CD45, is a key regulator in the immune system. It's a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase essential for activating T and B lymphocytes. PTPRC's role in modulating signal transduction pathways makes it crucial for the immune response, and dysregulation can lead to immune disorders.
PRG4
PRG4 (Proteoglycan 4): PRG4, also known as lubricin, plays a critical role in joint lubrication and cartilage integrity. It helps reduce friction in joints and protects cartilage surfaces from damage. Mutations in PRG4 can lead to joint disorders like camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome and are implicated in osteoarthritis.
RGS13
RGS13 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 13): RGS13 is involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling, specifically in modulating the signal transduction of certain hormones and neurotransmitters. It's particularly important in immune cells like mast cells and B cells, playing roles in allergy and immune responses.
RGS7
RGS7 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 7): RGS7 is involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, modulating their signaling pathways. It plays a role in neuronal function and has been implicated in neurological disorders.
RRAGC
RRAGC (Ras Related GTP Binding C): RRAGC is a member of the small GTPase family and plays a role in amino acid sensing and mTOR signaling. This gene is important for cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolic regulation. Dysregulation of RRAGC can impact cellular energy balance and has been linked to metabolic disorders.
SSBP3
SSBP3 (Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein 3): SSBP3 is involved in DNA repair and replication processes. It binds to single-stranded DNA and may play a role in maintaining genomic stability. Its function is critical in cellular response to DNA damage and has potential implications in cancer biology.

Calcium

ALDH7A1
ALDH7A1 (Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 7 Family Member A1): ALDH7A1 is involved in the metabolism of aldehydes and is essential for the detoxification of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a form of vitamin B6. Deficiency in ALDH7A1 leads to pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, a condition where seizures are caused by an abnormality in lysine metabolism and are responsive to vitamin B6 treatment.
ARL4C
ARL4C (ADP Ribosylation Factor Like GTPase 4C): ARL4C is a member of the ADP-ribosylation factor family of GTP-binding proteins, involved in cellular signaling and membrane trafficking. It plays a role in cytoskeletal organization and cell motility, and its expression has been linked to the development and progression of certain cancers.
ARRDC3
ARRDC3 (Arrestin Domain Containing 3): ARRDC3 is implicated in the regulation of cell signaling pathways and has been studied in the context of tumor suppression. It is involved in the regulation of receptor internalization and may play a role in cellular responses to external stimuli, including in metabolic regulation.
CCDC170
CCDC170 (Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 170): CCDC170 is a gene with a less well-understood function, but it has been implicated in breast cancer, particularly in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. It may play a role in cellular structure and organization.
CDC42SE1
CDC42SE1 (CDC42 Small Effector 1): CDC42SE1 is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell morphology, acting downstream of the CDC42 GTPase. It plays a role in cell division and movement, and its dysregulation can impact cell proliferation and migration.
CPED1
CPED1 (Cadherin Like And PC-Esterase Domain Containing 1): CPED1 is involved in cell adhesion and signaling, though its precise biological functions are not fully elucidated. It may play a role in developmental processes and has been associated with body mass index and adiposity.
DOK6
DOK6 (Docking Protein 6): DOK6 is part of the DOK family proteins, acting as substrates and regulators of tyrosine kinases. It's involved in signaling pathways related to nerve cell development and function. DOK6 has been implicated in neuronal differentiation and has potential relevance in neurological disorders.
FAM216B
FAM216B (Family With Sequence Similarity 216 Member B): FAM216B is a lesser-known gene with limited information available. Genes in the FAM216 family are believed to be involved in diverse cellular processes, but the specific function and role of FAM216B in human health and disease are not well characterized.
GAL
GAL (Galactose Alpha-1,3-Galactosyltransferase): GAL is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of the alpha-gal epitope, a carbohydrate antigen. It plays a role in immune response and xenotransplantation, as alpha-gal epitopes can cause immune rejection. The absence of this enzyme in humans leads to the production of anti-Gal antibodies.
GALNT3
GALNT3 (Polypeptide N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3): GALNT3 is involved in the process of O-linked glycosylation, where it adds N-acetylgalactosamine to proteins. This modification is important for protein function and cell signaling. Mutations in GALNT3 can lead to disorders such as familial tumoral calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium phosphate deposits in the body.
MARCO
MARCO (Macrophage Receptor With Collagenous Structure): MARCO is a receptor found on the surface of macrophages, playing a role in the immune system's response to pathogens and particulate matter. It's involved in the recognition and clearance of bacteria and environmental particles, contributing to innate immunity and inflammation regulation.
MECOM
MECOM (MDS1 and EVI1 Complex Locus): MECOM is a transcriptional regulator implicated in hematopoiesis and the development of certain cancers, particularly myeloid leukemia. It encodes EVI1, a protein involved in gene regulation, cell proliferation, and differentiation.
MN1
MN1 (Meningioma 1): MN1 is associated with the development of meningiomas, a type of brain tumor. It's believed to play a role in the regulation of gene expression and cellular growth. Alterations in MN1 have been implicated in other types of cancers as well.
NUDT2
NUDT2 (Nudix Hydrolase 2): NUDT2 is an enzyme that hydrolyzes diadenosine polyphosphates, molecules involved in cellular signaling. It plays a role in maintaining the balance of these signaling molecules within the cell, which is important for various cellular processes including stress responses and energy metabolism.
PRSS3
PRSS3 (Protease, Serine 3): PRSS3, also known as mesotrypsin, is a serine protease involved in protein digestion and potentially in the degradation of extracellular matrix components. It has been studied in the context of pancreatic function and cancer, as its abnormal expression or activity may contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis.
RSPO3
RSPO3 (R-Spondin 3): RSPO3 is part of the R-spondin family, which modulates the Wnt signaling pathway, crucial for embryonic development and cell growth. It has been implicated in various physiological processes, including vascular development and stem cell proliferation. Dysregulation of RSPO3 has been linked to diseases like cancer.
SEM1
SEM1 (Semaphorin 1): SEM1, also known as 26S proteasome complex subunit DSS1, is involved in DNA repair and the regulation of protein degradation via the proteasome. It plays a role in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis and genomic integrity. SEM1's dysfunction can have implications in cancer and other diseases involving proteasome dysfunction.
SMOC1
SMOC1 (SPARC Related Modular Calcium Binding 1): SMOC1 is part of the SPARC family of matricellular proteins, involved in tissue remodeling and angiogenesis. It plays a role in cell-matrix interactions and has been implicated in ocular and limb development. Mutations in SMOC1 are associated with Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome and other developmental disorders.
STK39
STK39 (Serine/Threonine Kinase 39): STK39 is a kinase involved in regulating ion transport and cellular volume, particularly in response to osmotic stress. It has been studied in relation to hypertension and kidney function, as it influences sodium and chloride reabsorption in the kidneys.
TNFRSF11B
TNFRSF11B (Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily Member 11B): TNFRSF11B, also known as osteoprotegerin, is a key regulator of bone metabolism. It acts as a decoy receptor for RANKL, inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and preventing bone resorption. It plays a critical role in bone density and strength, and alterations in its function are linked to osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

Sugar Cravings

AGMO
AGMO (Alkylglycerol Monooxygenase): AGMO is an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, specifically in the oxygenation of ether lipids. It plays a role in the metabolism of bioactive lipids, which are important for cell signaling and inflammation. Dysregulation of AGMO may impact lipid-related disorders and inflammatory conditions.
CLMP
CLMP (CXADR Like Membrane Protein): CLMP is involved in cell adhesion and is important for the integrity of tight junctions in epithelial cells. It's crucial for gastrointestinal tract development, and mutations in CLMP have been associated with congenital short bowel syndrome, a severe developmental disorder.
CST7
CST7 (Cystatin F): CST7 encodes a protein inhibitor of cysteine proteases, playing a role in immune regulation. It's particularly important in controlling the activity of proteases in immune cells like lymphocytes and macrophages. Dysregulation of CST7 can impact immune responses and has been linked to immune disorders.
DNAJA4
DNAJA4 (DnaJ Heat Shock Protein Family (Hsp40) Member A4): DNAJA4 is part of the Hsp40 family, proteins that assist in protein folding and prevent misfolded protein aggregation. It's involved in the cellular stress response, particularly in response to heat shock. Its function is crucial for maintaining protein homeostasis and cell survival under stress.
GOLGA8B
GOLGA8B (Golgin A8 Family Member B): GOLGA8B is a member of the golgin family of proteins, involved in the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. It plays a role in vesicle trafficking and cellular organization, although its specific functions are not fully understood.
HTR5A
HTR5A (5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor 5A): HTR5A encodes a serotonin receptor. Serotonin receptors are involved in various neurological processes, including mood, appetite, and sleep. HTR5A in particular is thought to play a role in the modulation of serotonin signaling in the brain.
ITGA4
ITGA4 (Integrin Subunit Alpha 4): ITGA4 is a cell adhesion molecule involved in leukocyte migration and immune responses. It's crucial for the immune system's ability to reach sites of inflammation. Dysregulation of ITGA4 can lead to autoimmune disorders and impacts the efficacy of immune responses.
KISS1R
KISS1R (Kisspeptin Receptor): KISS1R, also known as GPR54, is a receptor crucial for the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, playing a pivotal role in the onset of puberty and fertility. It binds to kisspeptin, a neuropeptide that stimulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, thereby influencing reproductive hormone levels. Mutations in KISS1R can lead to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition characterized by delayed or absent puberty and reproductive dysfunction. The receptor is also implicated in the regulation of metabolic processes and has been studied in the context of tumor suppression.
MTDH
MTDH (Metadherin): MTDH, also known as AEG-1, is a multifunctional protein implicated in several key cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and oncogenesis. It is heavily involved in the development and progression of various cancers, acting as an oncogene by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MTDH is a target for cancer therapy due to its role in enhancing chemoresistance and its association with poor clinical prognosis in cancer patients.
NOTCH1
NOTCH1 (Notch Receptor 1): NOTCH1 is a critical component of the Notch signaling pathway, which influences cell fate determination, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation during embryonic and adult tissue development. Dysregulation of NOTCH1 signaling contributes to a variety of disorders, notably including several forms of cancer, such as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and developmental abnormalities. The pathway's broad impact on cell proliferation and differentiation makes it a significant focus in developmental biology and oncology research.
ORC5
ORC5 (Origin Recognition Complex Subunit 5): ORC5 is a part of the origin recognition complex, a key element in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. It plays a vital role in ensuring accurate DNA replication, thereby maintaining genomic integrity. Dysfunctions in ORC5 or the replication initiation process can lead to genomic instability, a hallmark of cancerous cells, and contribute to developmental disorders linked to impaired cell proliferation.
RELN
RELN (Reelin): RELN encodes a large secreted extracellular matrix protein named reelin, which is crucial for neuronal migration and positioning during brain development. It affects the layering of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Mutations or alterations in RELN expression have been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Reelin also plays a role in synaptic plasticity in the adult brain, impacting learning and memory.
RARB
RARB (Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta): RARB is a nuclear receptor for retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A. It regulates gene expression in various developmental processes, particularly in the growth and differentiation of epithelial tissues and in the development of the nervous system. Abnormal expression or function of RARB has been linked to several types of cancers, including skin, lung, and breast cancer. It is also a focus in studies of developmental disorders and the potential therapeutic use of retinoids.
SERPINA1
SERPINA1 (Serpin Family A Member 1): SERPINA1, also known as alpha-1-antitrypsin, is a major protease inhibitor, primarily produced in the liver, and plays a vital role in protecting the lungs from neutrophil elastase. Deficiency in SERPINA1 can lead to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a genetic disorder that causes lung diseases like emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as liver diseases. It is crucial in maintaining the balance of proteolytic activity in lung tissues.
WSCD1
WSCD1 (WSC Domain Containing 1): WSCD1 is a relatively less-characterized gene and is believed to be involved in cell wall integrity and stress response in yeast. In humans, its precise function is not well established, but it may play a role in cellular responses to environmental stress. Understanding WSCD1's function could provide insights into mechanisms of cellular adaptation and survival under stress conditions.

Snacking

HES6
HES6 (Hes Family BHLH Transcription Factor 6): HES6 is a member of the HES family of transcription factors, which are important in the regulation of developmental processes. It acts primarily in neural differentiation and may inhibit the function of other HES proteins to promote neuronal differentiation. HES6 has been studied in the context of neurodevelopment and its dysregulation is implicated in certain neurological disorders.
LEP
LEP (Leptin): LEP encodes the hormone leptin, which is produced by adipose tissue and plays a key role in regulating energy balance and appetite. Leptin acts on the hypothalamus in the brain to inhibit appetite and stimulate energy expenditure. Dysregulation of leptin or its receptor leads to obesity and metabolic disorders, as it is crucial in the homeostatic control of body weight and fat storage.
LRRC4
LRRC4 (Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 4): LRRC4 is involved in neural development and is predominantly expressed in the brain. It may play a role in the formation and maintenance of the nervous system and has been studied in relation to brain tumors, particularly gliomas. LRRC4's function in neural cell adhesion and signaling makes it a gene of interest in neurobiology and cancer research.
LIN7C
LIN7C (Lin-7 Homolog C, Crumbs Cell Polarity Complex Component): LIN7C is part of the LIN7 family, involved in establishing and maintaining cell polarity, crucial for cell function and tissue organization. It's particularly important in neural and epithelial cells. LIN7C mutations or dysregulation can disrupt cell polarity and signaling, potentially leading to developmental abnormalities or diseases.
MC4R
MC4R (Melanocortin 4 Receptor): MC4R is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in regulating energy homeostasis, appetite, and body weight. Mutations in MC4R are one of the most common genetic causes of obesity due to its role in controlling energy balance. It is a target for developing obesity treatments.
LEPR
LEPR (Leptin Receptor): LEPR is the receptor for the hormone leptin. It's critical in regulating energy intake and expenditure, including appetite and metabolism. Mutations in LEPR can lead to leptin resistance, a condition often observed in obesity, where the body does not adequately respond to leptin signals.
SH2B1
SH2B1 (SH2B Adaptor Protein 1): SH2B1 is a key adaptor protein that supports various intracellular signaling pathways, especially those related to insulin and leptin. It's important for energy balance, body weight regulation, and glucose metabolism. Genetic variants of SH2B1 are associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

Health Areas Analysed in GetTested's DNA Diet & Nutrition Test

GetTested's DNA Diet & Nutrition test thoroughly examines several crucial health areas:

  • Macronutrients (Proteins, Fats, Carbohydrates): Firstly, it reveals how your body may react to different macronutrients, essential for fine-tuning your diet to boost energy and overall health.
  • Fat Metabolism (Saturated, Unsaturated, Omega-3 Fats): Additionally, the test provides insights into your body's processing of various fats, integral to a well-rounded diet.
  • Sensitivities and Intolerances (Gluten, Lactose, Alcohol, Caffeine, Histamine): Also, it helps identify possible sensitivities or intolerances, empowering you to make informed dietary decisions.
  • Vitamins and Minerals: Furthermore, the test uncovers how your body absorbs and utilizes vital vitamins and minerals, crucial for health and avoiding nutrient deficiencies.
  • Eating Behaviors (Overeating, Sugar Cravings, Snacking): Finally, discover genetic factors related to eating behaviors, offering strategies for healthier eating habits.

Personalized Recommendations

Following the analysis, you won't just get a genetic report but also personalized diet recommendations. These suggestions, customized to your genetic makeup, assist you in making knowledgeable choices for your nutritional needs.

Who Should Consider This Test

Anyone interested in optimizing their health through a genetics-informed diet will find this test ideal. It offers science-based advice for enhancing your nutrition.

Regarding Data Privacy and Sample Material

After analysis, we actively destroy the DNA and sample material. Your data remains completely anonymous, linked only to your unique test ID. Importantly, GetTested values your privacy; we never share or sell your results to third parties. Moreover, you have the option to delete your test results upon receipt.

FAQ

How is the DNA Diet & Nutrition test carried out?

Our DNA Diet & Nutrition test is a home test kit. After ordering, we will send you a kit with everything you need to collect the saliva sample. Then, simply return your sample to us in the pre-paid envelope.

How quickly will I receive my results?

Once we receive your sample, you can expect to get your results within 6-8 weeks.

When should I take the test?

The test can be collected at any time of the day.

Example Report

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Example of DNA Diet & Nutrition Test

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