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Allergy Test Medium

Test type
Lab Test

We offer two types of tests; Lab Tests and Rapid Tests. This product is under the category Lab Tests. See all our Lab Tests by following the link.

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Rapid Test

Reveals whether you have high levels of IgE, indicating potential allergic reactions. Gives positive or negative result.

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Collection method
Blood

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£ 149,00

GetTested’s Allergy Test Medium is our most extensive allergy test, designed to evaluate your sensitivity (IgE antibodies) to a wide range of 90 allergens. This includes an array of foods, pollen types, animal dander, mold varieties, and specific substances such as latex and bee venom. Conducted in a laboratory with ISO certification, this test stands out for its detailed analysis, all from a sample collected by you at home. Scroll down to see all items tested.

Histamine intolerance symptoms often resemble allergic reactions. Unsure if it’s an allergy or intolerance? In addition to histamine intolerance test, we also offer tests evaluating 40, 80, or 240 foods to help clarify.

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Allergy: Vegetables & Fruits

Apple
Apple allergy is an allergic reaction to proteins found in apples. It's commonly associated with Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS), particularly in individuals who are also allergic to birch pollen, as the proteins in apples can cross-react with birch pollen. Reactions can range from mild to severe, although severe reactions are less common with apple allergies.
Cacao
Cacao, the primary ingredient in chocolate, is beloved by many but can also be a source of allergies for some individuals. An allergy to cacao can manifest through various symptoms ranging from mild to severe, including skin reactions, gastrointestinal discomfort, respiratory issues, and, in rare cases, anaphylaxis. Understanding your body's response to cacao and related products is crucial for maintaining health and well-being.
Carrot
Carrot allergy is an allergic reaction to certain proteins found in carrots. It is relatively uncommon but can occur in individuals with sensitivities to certain plant-based foods. Carrot allergy is sometimes associated with Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS), especially in those who are allergic to birch or mugwort pollen, due to cross-reactivity of similar proteins.
Celery
Celery, a common ingredient in soups, salads, and snacks, can be a source of both allergy and intolerance for some individuals. While these conditions share similarities, they differ in their causes and how the body reacts. An allergy to celery is an immune system response to the proteins found in the vegetable, potentially leading to serious symptoms. Intolerance, however, usually affects the digestive system, leading to discomfort after consuming celery.
Citrus mix
Allergies to a citrus mix involve reactions to various citrus fruits without specifying particular types. This category often includes oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and possibly others, such as tangerines and pomelos. Individuals with citrus mix allergies react to the proteins found across these fruits, which can lead to an array of symptoms.
Corn
Corn intolerance is a digestive condition where the body has difficulty processing corn, leading to gastrointestinal symptoms. This intolerance differs significantly from a corn allergy, which is an immune system reaction and can be more severe and immediate in its effects.
Cucumber
Cucumber intolerance is a condition characterized by the body's difficulty in digesting cucumber, leading to gastrointestinal discomfort. This intolerance is distinct from a cucumber allergy, which involves an immune system response and can trigger more severe reactions. Cucumber intolerance typically results in digestive symptoms after consuming cucumbers.
Garlic/ Onion
Garlic and onion, members of the Allium family, are staple ingredients in many cuisines worldwide. However, for some individuals, these foods can trigger allergic reactions due to their unique compounds. Recognizing and managing garlic and onion allergies are crucial for maintaining a healthy, reaction-free diet.
Kiwi, Mango, Banana
Allergies to fruits such as kiwi, mango, and banana are increasingly recognized and can cause discomfort and severe reactions in sensitive individuals. These allergies stem from the body's immune system reacting to specific proteins found in these fruits, leading to a range of symptoms. Recognizing these allergies and managing them effectively is vital for maintaining health and well-being.
Peach
Peach allergy is an immune system response to proteins found in peaches, a condition more commonly observed in people with tree pollen allergies due to cross-reactivity. This type of allergy can vary from mild oral allergy symptoms to more severe, potentially life-threatening reactions like anaphylaxis.
Potato
Potato allergy is a relatively uncommon food allergy that involves an immune response to proteins found in potatoes. It can affect individuals of all ages and manifest in various ways, from skin reactions to gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms. This allergy can be triggered by both raw and cooked potatoes.
Soy
Soy allergy is a common food allergy, particularly in children, resulting from an immune system reaction to soy proteins. Found in a variety of foods and products, soy can trigger reactions ranging from mild symptoms to severe allergic responses like anaphylaxis. Soy allergy is often seen in early childhood, and some children may outgrow it over time.
Strawberry
Strawberry allergy is a reaction to certain proteins found in strawberries. It's relatively rare compared to other food allergies but can cause discomfort and health issues in sensitive individuals. The allergy can manifest in various ways, from mild reactions, such as oral allergy syndrome, to more severe systemic responses.
Tomato
Tomato allergy is an adverse immune response to proteins found in tomatoes. While not as common as some other food allergies, it can cause various symptoms in sensitive individuals. This type of allergy is often associated with skin reactions but can also affect other systems of the body.

Allergy: Nuts/Seeds

Almond, Pine Nut, Sunflower Seed
Allergies to almonds, pine nuts, and sunflower seeds are common concerns for many individuals. These reactions are triggered by the immune system's response to proteins found in these nuts and seeds, leading to various symptoms. Understanding, identifying, and managing these allergies are essential steps in ensuring safety and health.
Hazelnut
Hazelnut allergy is a type of tree nut allergy characterized by an allergic reaction to proteins found in hazelnuts. It is one of the more common nut allergies and can range from mild to severe, including the risk of anaphylaxis. Like other food allergies, hazelnut allergy is an immune response and can be triggered by both raw and cooked hazelnuts.
Peanuts
Peanut allergy is one of the most common food allergies, particularly in children, and involves an overreaction of the immune system to proteins found in peanuts. Unlike tree nut allergies, peanut allergy is to a legume, not a true nut. This allergy can range from mild reactions to severe, potentially life-threatening conditions like anaphylaxis.
Sesame
Sesame intolerance refers to adverse reactions or symptoms that some individuals may experience after consuming sesame seeds or sesame products. It differs from sesame allergies as it does not involve the immune system's response to specific proteins but is related to difficulties in digesting certain components in sesame.
Walnut
Walnut allergy is a type of tree nut allergy that is common and can cause serious reactions. The allergic reactions occur when the body's immune system mistakenly identifies proteins in walnuts as harmful. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and may include anaphylaxis. Individuals with walnut allergy may also experience cross-reactivity with other tree nuts and foods, making it crucial to identify and manage this allergy carefully.

Allergy: Grains

Barley
Barley is a common grain used in many foods and beverages, ranging from bread and cereals to beer. For some individuals, barley can trigger an allergic reaction due to its protein content. Recognizing the symptoms and managing a barley allergy is crucial for those affected.
Buckwheat
Buckwheat intolerance is a relatively rare condition where the body experiences difficulty digesting buckwheat, leading to various digestive symptoms. Unlike a buckwheat allergy, which involves an immune response and can cause severe reactions, intolerance is generally limited to gastrointestinal discomfort.
Cultivated Rye
Cultivated rye releases pollen that is a well-known cause of seasonal allergies. Its pollen season can overlap with grass pollen season, exacerbating symptoms for individuals with grass pollen allergies. When rye fields are flowering, nearby populations may experience a spike in hay fever symptoms.
Rice
Rice allergy is an uncommon food allergy where the body's immune system reacts to proteins found in rice. Although less prevalent than other food allergies, it can cause various symptoms in sensitive individuals. Rice allergy can affect both children and adults and may be triggered by both white and brown rice.
Wheat
Wheat allergy is an allergic reaction to proteins found in wheat. It's one of the most common food allergies, particularly in children, and should not be confused with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, which are different conditions. Wheat allergy can cause a range of symptoms, from mild to severe, including the risk of anaphylaxis.

Allergy: Foods

Baker’s yeast
Baker's yeast intolerance is a condition where individuals experience difficulty digesting baker's yeast, leading to gastrointestinal discomfort. This differs from a baker's yeast allergy, which involves an immune system response and can cause more severe reactions. People with baker's yeast intolerance typically experience digestive symptoms after consuming products made with baker's yeast.
Beef
Beef intolerance, a lesser-known condition compared to common food intolerances, occurs when an individual's digestive system reacts adversely to consuming beef. This intolerance differs from a beef allergy, which involves the immune system and can be more severe.
Blue Mussel, Oyster, Clam, Scallop
Shellfish allergies are among the most common food allergies, affecting both adults and children. This type of allergy often encompasses a range of shellfish, including blue mussel, oyster, clam, and scallop. Due to the potential severity of allergic reactions, understanding how to identify and manage an allergy to these shellfish is essential for those affected.
Chicken
Chicken intolerance is a condition where the body struggles to digest chicken, leading to digestive discomfort. This intolerance is different from a chicken allergy, which involves an immune response and can cause more severe and immediate reactions. People with chicken intolerance often experience gastrointestinal symptoms after eating chicken.
Cod
Cod allergy is an immune response to the proteins found in codfish, a common type of fish allergy. It's often seen in individuals who are allergic to other types of fish as well. Allergic reactions can range from mild to severe and can occur upon ingestion or sometimes even from inhaling cooking vapors.
Eel
Eel meat intolerance is a condition where individuals experience difficulty digesting eel meat, which is a type of seafood commonly consumed in various cuisines, particularly in Asia and Europe. This can lead to gastrointestinal discomfort. Eel meat intolerance differs from an eel meat allergy, which involves an immune system response and can cause more severe reactions. People with eel meat intolerance typically experience digestive symptoms after consuming eel meat or dishes containing it.
King crab
King crab, a delicacy in seafood cuisine, is prized for its taste and texture. However, some individuals may experience king crab intolerance, which can affect their enjoyment of this seafood.
Lamb
Lamb intolerance is a condition where individuals experience difficulty digesting lamb meat, leading to gastrointestinal discomfort. This intolerance is distinct from a lamb allergy, which involves an immune system response and can cause more severe reactions. People with lamb intolerance typically experience digestive symptoms after consuming lamb.
Lobster/Pacific squid
Lobster and Pacific squid are delicacies enjoyed by many but can pose allergy risks for some individuals. Allergies to these seafood items can lead to reactions ranging from mild symptoms to severe, potentially life-threatening conditions. Understanding how to recognize and manage allergies to lobster and Pacific squid is crucial for affected individuals.
Mackerel
Mackerel, a nutrient-rich oily fish, is a popular choice for its health benefits and distinct flavor. However, some individuals may experience mackerel intolerance, which can affect their ability to digest this fish without discomfort.
Plaice/Anchovy/Alaska Pollock
Allergies to seafood like plaice, anchovy, and Alaska pollock are common yet can significantly impact one's diet and lifestyle. These allergies occur when the immune system reacts to proteins found in these fish, leading to various symptoms. Understanding these allergies, their potential triggers, and how to manage them is essential for those affected.
Pork
Pork intolerance is a digestive condition where individuals have difficulty processing pork, leading to gastrointestinal discomfort. This intolerance is different from a pork allergy, which involves an immune system response and can cause more severe reactions. People with pork intolerance typically experience digestive symptoms after consuming pork.
Shrimp
Shrimp allergy is a common type of shellfish allergy, involving an immune reaction to proteins found in shrimp. It's one of the most common food allergies in adults and can cause a range of symptoms from mild to severe, including the risk of anaphylaxis. Shrimp allergy is typically lifelong and can be triggered by eating shrimp or even by inhaling steam from cooking shrimp.
Tuna/Salmon
Tuna and salmon are popular fish choices worldwide, known for their taste and health benefits. However, some individuals may experience allergic reactions to these fish, a condition that can range from mild discomfort to severe, life-threatening reactions. Understanding the symptoms, triggers, and management strategies for tuna and salmon allergies is essential for those affected.

Allergy: Pollen

Acacia
Acacia trees are popular ornamental plants that also produce allergenic pollen. They typically bloom in the late winter to spring, releasing pollen that can cause seasonal allergy symptoms. People living in areas with a high concentration of acacia trees may experience increased allergic reactions during these bloom periods.
Alder
Alder pollen is a common early spring allergen. When alder trees bloom, they release significant amounts of pollen into the air, often triggering allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, in sensitive individuals. People with alder allergies may notice their symptoms worsen on dry, windy days when pollen dispersal is at its peak.
Bermuda grass (pollen)
Bermuda grass pollen allergy is a type of allergic reaction to the pollen grains released by Bermuda grass, a common grass species in warmer regions, especially used for lawns, parks, and golf courses. This allergy is a form of seasonal allergic rhinitis, often flaring up during the grass-pollinating seasons, typically late spring and summer.
Birch (pollen)
Birch pollen means spring allergies. It floats in the air when birch trees bloom, causing watery eyes, runny noses, and sneezes. Stay ahead by checking pollen levels and keeping windows shut during peak season to dodge those spring sniffles!
Common Pigweed
Common pigweed is a prevalent weed known for causing allergic reactions in late summer and fall. Its pollen can be highly allergenic and is a common cause of hay fever and other allergic symptoms. Those sensitive to pigweed pollen may experience reactions during its peak pollination period.
Common Ragweed
Common ragweed is notorious for triggering fall allergies. As one of the most potent pollen producers, ragweed can affect individuals miles away from the actual plant. Its high pollen count is a prime cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, which affects many people as the summer transitions to autumn.
Cottonwood
Cottonwood trees, known for their cotton-like seeds, also produce pollen that can cause allergic reactions. During the spring, cottonwood trees release pollen that can aggravate allergies in sensitive individuals. This can lead to an increase in symptoms such as sneezing, congestion, and itchy eyes, particularly on windy days when the pollen is easily spread.
Cultivated Rye
Cultivated rye releases pollen that is a well-known cause of seasonal allergies. Its pollen season can overlap with grass pollen season, exacerbating symptoms for individuals with grass pollen allergies. When rye fields are flowering, nearby populations may experience a spike in hay fever symptoms.
Dandelion
Dandelions, though often seen as a simple weed or a herbal remedy, can cause allergic reactions or intolerances in some individuals. This typically occurs due to the pollen they release or from direct contact with the plant. Understanding the potential for an allergic reaction to dandelions is important, especially during their peak blooming season.
Goldenrod
Goldenrod is often mistakenly blamed for hay fever; however, it's the less visible ragweed that blooms simultaneously and is a more potent allergen. Goldenrod pollen is heavy and sticky, not typically airborne. Allergic reactions to goldenrod are rare but possible, typically causing typical hay fever symptoms.
Hazel
Hazel trees are early bloomers, often heralding the start of the allergy season for many individuals. Their catkins release copious amounts of pollen as early as winter or spring, which can cause significant allergic reactions in people with sensitivities to tree pollen.
Japanese Cedar
Japanese cedar, also known as Cryptomeria, is notorious for producing highly allergenic pollen. This pollen can trigger a condition known as "cedar fever," characterized by severe allergic reactions. Pollen release typically occurs from winter to early spring and can be intense, affecting a large number of individuals where these trees are prevalent.
Japanese Hop
Japanese hop, an invasive climbing plant, blooms in late summer and releases pollen that can cause allergic reactions. People who are sensitive to this type of pollen may experience increased symptoms during this time, especially in urban areas where the plant is more common.
Maple Leaf Sycamore
Maple leaf sycamore, also known as sycamore maple, is a significant source of springtime allergies. Its pollen can irritate those with sensitivities, leading to seasonal allergic rhinitis. Symptoms often flare up on sunny, breezy days when pollen is most abundant in the air.
Mugwort (pollen)
Mugwort pollen allergy is a reaction to the pollen of the mugwort plant, a common weed found in many parts of the world. This type of allergy typically occurs in late summer and fall when mugwort pollinates. It's known for causing hay fever symptoms and can be particularly troublesome for those with other plant-based allergies.
Plantain
Plantain weed, not to be confused with the banana-like fruit, is a common allergen found in grassy areas. Its inconspicuous flowers release pollen that contributes to seasonal allergy symptoms. While not as prominent a pollen producer as other weeds, plantain can be problematic for those with specific sensitivities.
Oak
Oak trees are prolific pollen producers and a major source of springtime allergies. When they release pollen, it can provoke significant allergic responses in people with sensitivities. Oak pollen season often leads to an increase in allergy and asthma symptoms due to the high pollen counts.
Olive (pollen)
Olive pollen allergy is a type of allergic reaction to the pollen grains released by olive trees. This allergy is especially prevalent in regions where olive trees are widely cultivated. Olive pollen is a common allergen and typically causes symptoms during the pollination season, which occurs in late spring and early summer.
Ox-eye Daisy
Ox-eye daisy is a charming perennial that can, unfortunately, trigger allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Its pollen is less commonly allergenic compared to other plants but can still contribute to hay fever symptoms for those with a predisposition.
Russian thistle
Russian thistle, also known as tumbleweed, can cause seasonal allergic reactions. Its pollen is a common allergen, especially in arid regions. During blooming seasons, the lightweight pollen can travel long distances, affecting many individuals. Symptoms are typical of hay fever and include sneezing, itchy eyes, and a runny nose.
Sweet Vernal/ Orchard Grass/ Common Reed/ Bent Grass
Grass pollen allergies, triggered by varieties such as sweet vernal, orchard grass, common reed, and bent grass, significantly impact individuals sensitive to these allergens. Understanding these allergies' nuances, identifying symptoms, and adopting effective management strategies can mitigate discomfort and improve quality of life during peak pollen seasons.
Timothy grass (pollen)
Timothy grass pollen allergy is a reaction to the pollen of Timothy grass, a common type of grass used in hay and prevalent in many temperate regions. This allergy is a form of seasonal allergic rhinitis and typically flares up during the grass's pollinating season, usually in late spring and early summer.
White Ash
White ash trees contribute to seasonal pollen counts, particularly in the spring when they flower. The airborne pollen from white ash can trigger allergic reactions in sensitive individuals, adding to the array of tree pollens present during allergy season.
White Pine
White pine trees, with their long, slender needles, are lesser-known contributors to pollen-related allergies. While their pollen is not as potent as that of some other trees, it can still cause symptoms in those with specific sensitivities, especially when pollen levels peak in the spring.
Willow
Willow trees release pollen early in the spring, contributing to seasonal allergy symptoms for many individuals. The light, easily dispersed pollen can provoke an immune response in those with a sensitivity to willow, leading to discomfort during what is often a beautiful time of year.

Allergy: Pets

Cat dander
Cat allergy is a common allergic reaction to proteins found in a cat's skin cells, urine, and saliva. It is one of the most common pet allergies and can cause various symptoms, ranging from mild to severe, in sensitive individuals. These allergens can be carried on clothing and can linger in environments where cats have been.
Dog dander
Dog allergy is an allergic reaction to proteins found in a dog's skin cells (dander), saliva, and urine. It's a common form of pet allergy and can cause various symptoms in sensitive individuals. These allergens can be carried on clothing and can linger in environments where dogs have been.
Guinea Pig
Guinea pig allergies are caused by proteins found in the animal's dander, saliva, and urine. People with this allergy might experience symptoms when they come into contact with guinea pigs or their living environments. Symptoms can be immediate or develop over time with repeated exposure.
Hamster
Hamster allergies are triggered by allergens found in the animal's dander, saliva, and urine. People with hamster allergies can have reactions from direct contact with the animal or from the allergens dispersed in the air. Such reactions are common in homes with these pets or in pet care facilities.
Horse
Horse allergy is an allergic reaction to proteins found in a horse's skin cells (dander), saliva, and urine. It is less common than cat or dog allergies but can cause similar symptoms in sensitized individuals. People who work with horses or frequently visit stables are more likely to develop this allergy.
Mouse/Rat
Allergies to mice and rats are common, especially in laboratory settings or homes where these animals are kept as pets. Allergens from mice and rats are present in their urine, dander, and saliva, which can become airborne and lead to allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.
Rabbit
Navigating the complexities of rabbit allergies involves understanding two distinct aspects: dietary intolerance to rabbit meat and allergic reactions to keeping rabbits as pets. Whether it's the consumption of rabbit meat that triggers symptoms or exposure to pet rabbits, being informed and cautious is crucial for those affected.
Sheep Wool
Sheep wool allergy is commonly mistaken for a reaction to the wool fibers themselves, but it's usually sensitivity to lanolin (wool grease) or other substances within the wool that triggers allergic responses. These responses can occur when wearing clothing made from sheep's wool or when exposed to wool in other products.

Allergy: Mold/Yeast

Acarus siro
Acarus siro, commonly known as the flour mite, is often found in stored grains and flour. These mites can proliferate in kitchen cupboards and pantries, especially if the storage conditions are humid. For individuals with sensitivities, exposure to Acarus siro can lead to allergic symptoms and can be particularly troublesome for those with pre-existing respiratory conditions.
Alternaria Alternata
Alternaria alternata is a mold that disperses spores into the air, causing allergic reactions. It grows on many plants and materials, thriving in warm, damp conditions. People with sensitivity to this mold may experience symptoms during dry, windy weather when spore counts peak.
Aspergillus Fumigatus
Aspergillus fumigatus is a type of mold that thrives in soil and decaying organic matter but can also be found indoors. It’s a significant allergen that can lead to respiratory conditions like allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in susceptible individuals, particularly those with asthma or cystic fibrosis.
Candida albicans
Candida albicans is a type of yeast that can affect various parts of the body, most commonly manifesting as vaginal yeast infections and gut overgrowth. Vaginal infections bring itching, discomfort, and discharge, often due to flora imbalance. In the gut, overgrown Candida albicans disrupts digestion, causing bloating and bowel habit changes. Diet, health, and antibiotics influence both conditions, requiring tailored treatments to restore balance and relieve symptoms.
Cladosporium herbarum (Mold)
Mold allergy, particularly to Cladosporium herbarum, is a common allergic reaction to the spores of this widespread mold. Cladosporium herbarum can be found both indoors and outdoors, often in damp areas. People sensitive to mold spores may experience allergic symptoms when exposed to this mold.
Penicillium notatum
Penicillium notatum is a common mold known for its role in producing penicillin. In the home, it may cause allergies, particularly in damp areas. Exposure to this mold can trigger respiratory symptoms and allergic reactions in sensitive individuals, especially those with mold allergies.

Allergy: Other

Bee venom
Bee venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when an individual has an allergic reaction to bee stings. This type of allergy triggers the immune system to overreact to the proteins found in bee venom, leading to symptoms that can range from mild local swelling to severe systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Understanding and recognizing the signs of a bee venom allergy is key to managing and treating this condition effectively.
CCD (Cross-reactive Carbohydrate Determinants)
Understanding the role of Cross-reactive Carbohydrate Determinants (CCDs) in allergy testing is crucial for accurately diagnosing allergies. CCDs are complex sugar structures found on the surface of plant and animal proteins that can lead to false-positive results in allergy tests.
Cockroach
Cockroach allergy occurs when an individual's immune system reacts to proteins in cockroaches' feces, saliva, and body parts. It is a common cause of indoor allergies and can trigger or worsen asthma symptoms, especially in urban areas and in homes with infestations.
Latex
Latex allergy arises from an adverse immune response to natural rubber latex, a material derived from the sap of the rubber tree. Used in numerous products, from medical devices to everyday items, latex can trigger reactions ranging from skin irritation to severe anaphylaxis in sensitive individuals.
Total IgE
Total IgE testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic process for allergies. This test measures the overall levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in the blood, which are produced as a response to allergens. Elevated Total IgE levels can suggest a heightened allergic sensitivity, although they do not pinpoint specific allergens.
Wasp venom
Wasp venom allergy is a serious condition that arises when an individual reacts allergically to the sting of a wasp. This allergy can cause symptoms ranging from localized pain and swelling to severe anaphylactic shock. Unlike bee stings, wasp stings can be particularly aggressive because wasps can sting multiple times, increasing the risk of a severe allergic reaction.

Why Choose Allergy Test Medium (IgE)?

The Allergy Test Medium is your solution for identifying specific allergies, aiding in better management and treatment of symptoms. Whether it's seasonal allergies, food sensitivities, or reactions to environmental factors, this test covers a broad spectrum to pinpoint your triggers.

How It Works

Collect your sample at home with our easy-to-use kit and send it back to our ISO-certified laboratory for detailed analysis. Within 10-15 days, you'll receive a lab report detailing your reactions to 90 allergens.

FAQ

How is the Allergy test Medium carried out?

Our Allergy test Medium is a home test kit. After ordering, we will send you a kit with everything you need to collect a small blood sample. Then, simply return your sample to us in the pre-paid envelope.

What happens if I fail to take the sample?

If you read the instructions carefully before you take the test and it should go well. Should something go wrong, you are welcome to contact us and we will help you.

How quickly will I receive my results?

Average response time is 10-15 business days.

Can I trust the test result?

We work with several accredited and certified laboratories with long experience and which are trusted and used by doctors/practitioners all over Europe. Our partner labs are certified in accordance with EN ISO 15189 and ISO 13485.

Anything to consider before taking the test?

For best results, exposure to the tested foods is recommended within three months before the test. Lack of recent exposure may affect the sensitivity of the test outcomes.

Example Report

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Example of Allergy Test Medium

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